Reflection Series

Walking The Emmaus Road Together Series

The introductory video lays out the landscape of this series. It invites you to allow the questions of your heart and mind to surface as we walk the path together like the two disciples on the road to Emmaus (Luke 24: 13-35). It is a journey of conversation and deep listening. It is about walking together beginning to unearth the meaning of events that touch us and shape our reality. It is about becoming aware of the many realities that might be alien to us, but are the daily lived realities of so many others. It is about engaging with the “questions that have no right to go away” (Sometimes – David Whyte).


Read Full article here: https://emmauscentre.ie/walking-together/

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What am I becoming aware of within myself and in the world?

This slowing down in our lives is allowing us the space the time and to attend to the questions that have long troubled us. Br Philip Pinto reminds us of the inequalities in our world and, to heed the cry of the earth and the poor. We have been aware of this in our lives but probably, caught in the frenzy of a busy life, have not been able to truly appreciate the significance of those cries. Now, in this time of pandemic, we are implored again.

Read Full Article here: https://emmauscentre.ie/what-am-i-becoming-aware-of-within-myself-and-in-the-world/

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Justice is What Love Looks Like in Public


We invited the Justice Desk, A Human Rights NPO based in South Africa to share their reflections on some of these hidden issues of the pandemic. Kayla Brittan (Operations Manager) and Ignatius France (Training Coordinator)share their thoughts on how some of these issues laid bare during this pandemic.

 

 

What issues have come into your awareness during this time?
How has this awareness impacted you and your attitude to life?
What systemic structure in your society would you like to work towards changing?

 

Read Full Article here: https://emmauscentre.ie/justice-is-what-love-looks-like-in-public/

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What is Next on Education after Covid-19?

Malcolm Gertse (Community Empowerment Coordinator) and Prudence Jantlo (Education Coordinator) of the Justice Desk, A Human Rights NPO based in South Africa share their thoughts on the impact that Covid 19 has had on education in South Africa.

Parents across the country, here in Ireland, have had to work with home schooling their children. It has not been an uniform experience for all parents. Some have by some stroke of genius mastered it while others have fumbled their way through at all times, trying their best. Parents have experienced a real mixed bag when it comes to engagement with schools and teachers.

Read Full Article here: https://emmauscentre.ie/covid-19-what-is-next-on-education/
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We Are in This Together – Let’s Talk About Gender-Based Violence

Paul Keaveny, writing for The Conversation, said that “Gender-based violence is a hidden consequence of the COVID-19 pandemic.” He highlighted the heightened risk of domestic and gender based violence for vulnerable women and children staying at home. Yes, “sexual and gender-based violence does not begin with disasters like COVID-19. But the chaos and instability they cause leave women and girls more vulnerable.”

The cries of abused women, men and children who are victims of gender based violence have fallen on many deaf ears. In the situation where perpetrators and victims of violence have been confined to the same space during Covid 19 related restrictions there has been a spike in domestic violence. In Ireland, Women’s Aid and the Garda reported a 30% increase in reported cases of domestic violence (Irish Times, April 27, 2020).

Full Article Here: https://emmauscentre.ie/we-are-in-this-together-lets-talk-about-gender-based-violence/

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Privileged or Penalised?

Social justice tries to look at a system (political, economic, social, cultural, religious, and mythical) within which we live so as to name and change those structural things that account for the fact that some of us are unduly penalised even as others are unduly privileged. Thus social justice has to do with issues such as poverty, inequality, war, racism, sexism, abortion, and lack of concern for ecology because what lies at the root of each of these is not so much someone’s private sin or some individual’s private inadequacy but rather a huge, blind system that is inherently unfair. Ronald Rolheiser

In these times of the global pandemic and the ensuing restrictions, we have become acutely aware of the inequalities in our society and systems not only locally but globally. This pandemic has held up the mirror to us to make us aware of injustices in our social systems.

Full Article Here: https://emmauscentre.ie/12288-2/

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Today we hear from Fr Kevin Ward. Kevin, originally from County Meath, has been ministering in India for many years now. Presently he serves as a priest in the Diocese of Nongstoin in the West Khasi Hills of the North Eastern state of Meghalaya.

He shares his perspective on the pandemic from his Indian experience. Meghalaya has been one of the states in India that has not suffered the brunt of the pandemic. They recognised early that the pandemic had created the fear of a loss of life and of the loss of livelihood. The regional Government acted swiftly to mitigate the spread of the virus. One of the actions it took was to consider every person in the region as an asymptomatic carrier of the virus. This step was taken by the local Health and Family Welfare Department to prevent the threat of community transmission. Its understanding was that the moment someone thought they could be Covid positive, their behaviour would change — they would be more cautious and feel responsible for their actions, and thus help in reducing the risk of community transmission.

Full Article Here: https://emmauscentre.ie/an-act-of-love-in-action/

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